An IT Transformation

Years ago, when I started working at my system as an employed physician, my perception of the IT department wasn’t very flattering. My first interaction occurred when we wanted to download the patient demographics from my billing company’s software to theirs. The program used was a common one on the market but the answer was a resounding no. As a geek I know a little about databases, so I knew it could be done. When asked “why not” my IT deptpartner and I were told that IT was concerned about getting a virus. What?!?! Seriously? So my staff started from zero inputting data for a few thousand patients. What a waste of their time.

My next aggravation was software upgrades done at convenient hours–for IT. The idea of taking down a system during regular working hours at any large corporation was ludicrous but at a hospital? When discussing that the “tail seemed to wag the dog” in our system, administrator types would just nod sadly. When our outpatient EHR was being chosen I hoped to be on the physician committee to help. No such luck. Partly because there was no such committee. Seriously?

In early 2012 my geekiness finally became obvious to administration. Someone decided I would make a good EHR Physician Champion. As Allscripts Enterprise was implemented I threw myself into the job. The program and the process was frustrating in many ways but slowly I met a lot of people in the IT department. The first surprising thing was how excited analysts were to have a doctor willing to talk to them. I’d get email questions about how best to configure things to fit physician workflow. One day it hit me. The irritation doctors had often matched the analysts’ angst when making EHR configurations for patient care matters. Sometimes it was as simple as not having access to a doctor to ask the question.

It is clear that lack of usability in EHR systems has to do with inadequate end-user input.[1,2] The good news is that there is a refreshing change in attitude. As more physicians move into leadership positions, IT leaders appear delighted to partner with us to improve patient care.  Another silo is torn down to serve our patients better. Life as a doctor just got a little bit lighter. And maybe that’s true for the software analysts and project directors over in the IT building who more and more are recognized as being an important part of the healthcare team.

  1. 1. EHR design flaws causing doctors to revert to paper. Dolan, Pam. amednews.com 4/8/13  http://www.amednews.com/article/20130408/business/130409961/6/
  2. 2. What causes physicians to become dissatisfied with EHRs? Murphy Ph.D, Kyle. EHRIntelligence.com 12/13/2013 http://ehrintelligence.com/2013/12/03/what-causes-physician-to-become-dissatisfied-with-ehrs/

 

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