Mission Accomplished

Mrs. Smith is adamant, “That amlodipine is making me tired! I can’t take it.” Ms. Smith is 86 years old and her blood pressure is reaching a systolic of 200. She’s still mentally alert and volunteers at a local hospital every week, drives herself to places nearby and lives alone. It is scaring me because I don’t want her to stroke. This is the third BP med she has rejected in as many months. I’ve checked for other causes but think her age is just catching up to her.  Previously she has had a systolic in the 150’s and several years ago we tried several meds, all of which she refused to take. I gave up then but now I’m much more concerned. She has no family to speak of…we go over the pros and cons of the medication. She reluctantly agrees that if she dies from a stroke that would be fine but being in a nursing home unable to talk or walk would be horrible. She will try the medication for another month. “But doctor if I can’t do the things I want to do, I am not going to keep taking it!” She agrees to try it and surprises me with a hug as she walks out the door. “It’s OK Dr. Nieder, I’m not going to live forever.”

Tim Jones slammed his finger in a door and sees the hand doctor on Monday for a non-displaced fracture of his little finger. He wants to ride this weekend in a 100 mile bike ride for some charity or other. “Honestly, what is the risk?” We discuss the fact that the ride itself could cause swelling of the fingers and lots of pain, not to mention if he falls and hits it. “They splinted it really well at the immediate care center. I promise not to take too much ibuprofen.” I give my blessing and hope he is safe.

Mary White arrives, late as usual. My staff is used to that, so they try to schedule her at the end of the day. She has a short litany of minor issues, brings me up to speed on her minor medical problems with specialists, has her yearly exam, we discuss her perfect blood chemistries and she is out the door. 

After 25 years, my patients have me well-trained. And vice-versa–they only call me at night with true emergencies and they apologize when they wake me, they rarely call for last minute refills because they forgot, they bring their meds with them when they come for an appointment and they arrive on time because I’m on time (well, at least I was until Electronic Health Records began three weeks ago). Reflecting on my practice it occurs to me that this is what I hoped my patient relationships would be like at this point in my professional life. 

Mission accomplished. Wonder what comes next?

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