The Epic Circus Winds Down

For the last two weeks I’ve had my head down jumping through hoops, working hard to personalize Epic so my

 JEFF HEINZ/The Globe Gazette

JEFF HEINZ/The Globe Gazette

documentation is accurate, thoughtful and describes the patient’s story to the reader. We’ve had the usual glitches with hardware and software but the major problems have eased. I still don’t like the “dumb” thin clients which lock me out of the patient’s chart and have me walking up and down the hallway in order to close the software in one location so I can put orders in or finish my note in another. It is a terrific waste of time.

So what do I like about Epic?

  • -The interface is pleasant to the eye.
  • -The ability to make physician-specific templates of things I say to patients and staff repetitively on-the-fly, as I see patients.
  • -The big screen format.
  • -The ability to communicate with patients via the MyChart portal in a more robust manner.
  • -Releasing patient notes to them in the portal (although it sure would be nice to have a default button so I wouldn’t have to choose that option every time).
  • -Having an online community on the Epic site to discuss software “fixes”.
  • -In March, all of my system’s employed physicians, Immediate Care facilities, hospitals and ERs in my area will be onboard. Since the chart is patient centric, I’ll be able to see what’s going on in those facilities.
  • -Some true intraoperability–I can access patient information from any other Epic source in the country, including across town. This is huge and has already impacted patient care in a positive way.
  • -Having support in Verona, WI (home to EpicCare) with the expertise and desire to help you.

What I don’t like about Epic:

  • -Everything we do with patients is an “encounter”. I have to open one to write an order, document a telephone conversation, etc. If I open one and change my mind, I still have to sign the darn thing instead of just cancelling out of the encounter.
  • -It is too “clicky”. Things that should be accomplished in one click takes multiple. Thank goodness there are plenty of keyboard shortcuts but for individuals that aren’t used to using them, that is of little help.
  • -The lack of a Verona-based Epic expert in our office the first day of GoLive. We spent so much time figuring out simple things that someone with more training and experience could have told us in seconds.
  • -My work environment is not designed well. I have to strain my neck to keep eye contact with patients, or turn the computer away from them. I’ve got to work on this. There has to be a better way.
  • -The most annoying thing, and a big backward step for me, is the inability to get email notifications when a patient messages me on the MyChart Portal. Since 2013 my patients have had answers to their medical questions at odd hours of the night or on weekends. That is not possible with MyChart, although I guess I can get a one time notification in the evening if someone has sent me a message IF my system Leadership approves (and why would they not OK that?). This is definitely a step backwards, and in a time when patient engagement is considered so vital, it seems odd that the arguably “best in Klas” EHR doesn’t have that functionality.

Oh, and did I mention how much I dislike the thin clients?

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